Category Archives: MAJCO

COMMON INTEREST FROM BUTTE

Shalom to everyone.

I am writing to introduce an opportunity to contribute to the legacy of the Butte Montana Jewish community. Please note that I am writing to you as an individual rather than on behalf of the Congregation.

On May 10 and May 11, 2019 the Butte Silver Bow Public Archives, (www.buttearchives.org) (bsbarchives@bsb.mt.gov) will host a workshop to begin to document the history and culture of the Jewish community in Butte.

The Archives has received a Common Heritage Grant from the National Endowment for Humanities, (NEH).

The Archives is interested in oral histories, manuscripts for digitalization, family trees and histories, artifacts to be loaned for exhibit and returned to owners, ephemera (stuff) relating to the Jewish community. They are interested to learn when how and why Jews came to Butte, where they came from, their means of travel to get here, how they made a living and raised their families. What part did our ancestors take in Butte’s history? Details about the Congregations and Temples are of interest.

The Archives is a professional organization that has the means to properly care for anything sent to them to help in the project.

If you know of anything that might help in this project, please let the archives know. The details to contact the Archives are below. Please check out their website. Thank you for your interest in this project.

Dave Canty

BUTTE-SILVER BOW PUBLIC ARCHIVES
17 W. Quartz St.
Butte, Mt. 59701
(406) 782-3280
http://www.buttearchives.org
bsbarchives@bsb.mt.gov
Ellen Crain, Archives Director
Nikole Evankovich, Assistant Director

Advertisements

LOOKING FOR JEWISH WAR VETERANS IN MONTANA, BY ROBERT SHAY

My name is Robert Shay and I am the Commander of the Pacific NW Post 686 of the Jewish War Veterans of the United States. Our organization was formed in 1896 by 36 Jewish veterans of the Union Army, in the Civil War. Originally we were the Hebrew Union Veterans Association and in the 1920’s we merged with the Jewish Spanish American War veterans group and became the J.W.V.

The reason I am writing is to connect with Jewish veterans in Montana, so that hopefully, our National Commander who has vacation property near Plains, can make a trip to the state. Our Post is located in Bellevue, WA, and I am working on our outreach to veterans in states where there is not a Post. I have been working through Brian Schnitzer, MAJCo and have made connections in Helena and Billings.

My wife and I are retired and have enjoyed many road trips across Montana to tour our National Parks, visit relatives and former family home towns in North Dakota, Minnesota and South Dakota. We are also hoping to make another trip to Glacier this year to finally get across the pass on the Highway To The Sun, which we have failed to do on two previous trips. We also want to make a trip across the north highway to visit the Fort Peck Veterans Memorial. I have been in contact with the sculptor and am very impress with her work.

If you know of any Jewish veterans in Montana please have them contact me as I am offering free first year membership to our organization.

Thank you for any help you can offer,

Bob Shay
206.478.0505
https://www.jwv.org

Is There a World War 1 Memorial or Monument in your hometown?
If yes, please contact me.

Robert “Bob” Shay
Commander, Jewish War Veterans, Pacific NW Post 686
Chaplain, Veterans of Foreign Wars Lake Washington Post 2995
Volunteer Monument Hunter for the United States World War 1 Centennial Commission

PLEASE MARK YOUR CALENDAR FOR THIS UPCOMING EVENT: CHANUKIOT LIGHTING AT THE CAPITOL IN HELENA AND MAJCO MEETING

2018 MAJCo State Capitol Chanukiot Lighting Event & Meeting

*** Thursday, December 6 ***

Lighting of community chanukiot and address by the Governor, or his representative – noon
(MAJCo meeting to follow in capital conference room to be announced)
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Although having to accept the trickiness of Montana’s weather and shorter days in December, it is hoped that many will be able to attend. It is 683 miles by road from Libby to Wibaux. Lewistown is the geographic center of our state, but the early pioneers did not see it fit to establish the capital there. It certainly would have made driving from Billings, and equally Whitefish, more convenient!

The lighting of the chanukiot (all are invited to bring their own and the five candles needed for the 4th day) will be followed by an address by Governor Bullock or his representative. Afterwards MAJCo spiritual leaders are each welcome to add some brief, hopefully nonpartisan and nonsectarian, remarks.

The one hour MAJCo meeting scheduled for 1:00 PM historically was a winter telephone conference. The yearly physical meeting was instead held at the Shabbaton in the spring/summer/fall. It still seems important to get together at least occasionally in order to maintain a sense of family. One of the major topics we need to discuss is our plans as to future meetings.

But, the most important issue for discussion is our vision as to the future of MAJCo. It was created when we had only six very similar communities with only rare resident rabbi’s and no other statewide organizations. Our congregations were small with few available resources. Communicating with each other, and the outside Jewish world, was more difficult and infrequent then. We were very particular to, within broad bounds, not suggest to others how to think or vote, and certainly not how to pray.

Is there a need any longer for a secular organization like MAJCo, and can it even fulfill its stated purposes?

Please try your best to be there. You are encouraged to bring any MAJCo related items that may have accumulated in your closets for exchanging. All are hoped to be back on the roads heading home around 2:00 PM.

ISRAELI AID TO CALIFORNIA

Israeli NGO sends aid to California in wake of unprecedented wildfires
IsraAID’s emergency response team provides help building resilience and recovery in communities hard hit by the deadly blazes.
By Nicky Blackburn November 19, 2018

Israeli NGO, IsraAID, is sending an emergency response team to California to help communities affected by the unprecedented fires that have killed 80 and destroyed over 13,000 homes and buildings. More than 1,300 people are still listed as missing.

The two blazes broke out 10 days ago in both north and south California and quickly spiraled out of control. The Camp Fire wildfire, which wiped out the town of Paradise in Butte county (population 27,000), is already the deadliest and most destructive fire in California history, torching an area the size of Chicago.

The Woolsey fire has burned over 98,362 acres in southern California near the border of Ventura and Los Angeles counties.

After a request from local communities, IsraAID is to conduct a needs assessment of the population in affected areas, promote community resilience and recovery, and distribute relief items to families currently staying in temporary accommodation after losing their homes in the fires.

Yotam Polizer, the co-CEO of IsraAID, told ISRAEL21c that a team of four Israelis have already flown out to California, and plan to set up operations in Chico, where many evacuees are now living in tent cities, shelters and even sleeping in their cars.

“We’ve seen a lot of disaster zones over the years, but this is a whole different level of devastation. Everything has been burned to the ground, and there are so many people still missing,” said Polizer, who has just returned from California.

“The search and rescue teams aren’t looking for survivors, they are looking for remains. From a psychological perspective it’s on a whole different scale.

“When we talk to local people we see they are getting support, but there’s very little psycho-social support there. That’s where we are planning to focus our efforts.”

IsraAID’s team will include Israeli and US-based mental health specialists, who will work with partner organizations on-the-ground to support affected communities as they recover and promote community resilience.

“We were devastated by the tragedy of these fires in California,” said Polizer. “It’s a place very close to our hearts. We have an office there, lots of staff members and volunteers. A lot of local people asked that we come and help. We are planning to be there to support the people as long as we are needed.”

This is not the first time that IsraAID has sent aid in the wake of deadly fires in California. In October last year, a team of seven aid workers – including Polizer – helped out in evacuation centers in Napa Valley, after a series of wildfires swept the state killing 44, causing $14.5 billion in damages, and forcing 90,000 people to evacuate.

The Israeli team were stationed in Santa Rosa, California, and helped coordinate and provide relief supplies and stress management to the affected community.

Even today, IsraAID continues to work with the community there to help them build resilience.

IsraAID has extensive experience responding to disasters in the US and all over the world. This year alone, the organization provided aid to victims in Florida in the wake of Hurricane Michael, North Carolina, after Hurricane Florence, to the Philippines, Indonesia, India, Kenya, and to Guatemala after the volcano.

JEWS, MOSLEMS, AND CHRISTIANS

Video of United Hatzalah by Popular Israeli-Arab Vlogger Goes Viral
by TheTower.org Staff | 11.15.18

A video of the Israeli first-responder organization, United Hatzalah of Israel, produced by the popular Israeli-Arab vlogger (video blogger), NAS Daily, became the most-viewed video about an Israeli non-profit in just one week, The Jerusalem Post reported Wednesday.

NAS, as Nuseir Yassin is known, produces one-minute videos on topics of interest that he posts to Facebook, where he has 10 million followers.

Though most of Yassin’s videos garner between 2 and 10 million views, in one week the United Hatzalah video was viewed by 22.5 million people. (The number is now at 25 million.)

Introducing the United Hatzalah video, Yassin wrote that the organization is “one of the most impressive things I’ve seen in a while.”

“The change has been palpable,” Eli Beer, the founder of United Hatzalah of Israel, said of the international response to the video. “People around the world have been sending us messages, friend requests, and requests for help. They have expressed interest in setting up their own versions of our life-saving model in their cities and communities. We’ve had a lot of interest in particular from India, the Philippines and various cities in the United States.”

Yassin, who has been traveling around the world for nearly three years, usually makes one-minute videos, and signs off with “That’s one minute! See you tomorrow!” However, the United Hatzalah video runs nearly four minutes.

“The people at United Hatzalah of Israel are doing incredible work. All for free. All to save lives. Here is how they did it,” Yassin wrote. “Thank you Eli Beer and the team of volunteers for reaching out to Nas Daily and letting me film your operations. All around impressive.”

The video currently has 11,000 comments and has been shared over 400,000 times.

“Our model can save lives around the world, so we are excited that we received this exposure and that Nuseir succeeded in spreading our message around the globe so quickly,” Dov Maisel, the Vice President of Operations for United Hatzalah, explained. “We look forward to working with all interested parties to help them develop our lifesaving model and saving more lives all over the planet.”

Vice President of United Hatzalah Michael Brown added, “We are incredibly thankful to Nuseir and his team for the light that they have shone on our operations and on the coexistence that exists between our Jewish, Muslim and Christian volunteers in Israel. As an Israeli Arab, Nuseir has a valuable perspective on coexistence in Israel and I am glad that he was able to tell our story.”

MAJCO CHANUKIOT IN HELENA

2018 MAJCo State Capital Chanukah Event & Meeting

*** Thursday, December 6 ***

Lighting of community chanukiot and address by the Governor – noon
(MAJCo meeting to follow in capital conference room to be announced)
______________________________________

WHAT IS MAJCo?

The Montana Association of Jewish Communities (MAJCo) is an umbrella organization that includes representation from Jewish communities across the length and breadth of the great state of Montana. Membership in MAJCo is open to any Jewish community, whatever the “stream,” within Montana. (Acceptance by the current communities is required.)

Small Jewish communities in rural areas do not exist in a vacuum. Three decades ago, our Jewish communities created MAJCo, an association of all the organized Montana Jewish communities. Through MAJCo, we keep in touch and have created a community throughout this great big beautiful state.

The Jewish communities in the Big Sky currently include:
• Congregation Beth Aaron, Billings
• Chabad Lubavitch of Montana, Bozeman
• Congregation Beth Shalom, Bozeman
• Congregation B’nai Israel, Butte
• Congregation Aitz Chaim, Great Falls
• Helena Jewish Community, Helena
• Glacier Jewish Community/B’nai Shalom, Kalispell-Whitefish
• Chabad Lubavitch of Missoula, Missoula
• Congregation Har Shalom, Missoula

THE PITTSBURGH SLAYINGS AND THE SEARCH FOR AMERICA’S SOUL

THE PITTSBURGH SLAYINGS AND THE SEARCH FOR AMERICA’S SOUL
(Opinion on behalf of the Billings “Montana Interfaith Network,” submitted by the Rev. Dr. Paul Seastrand)

It is estimated that in the last 800 years, half of the world’s Jews have died violently, and on October 27, eleven more Jews in a Pittsburgh synagogue were added to that count by a man hurling anti-Semitic slurs and bullets. Yet though the history of anti-Semitism is immeasurably tragic, the slayings in Pittsburgh bring us face to face with another sobering fact: The religious and cultural diversity that is the heritage and strength of America has too often devolved into religious and cultural animosity.

Though affiliated with the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, I write on behalf of the Montana Interfaith Network which represents Christian, Jewish, Muslim, Native American, and other historic faith communities who “advocate for the dignity, sanctity, and equality of every human being.” This advocacy finds common cause, as well, with the aims of civil freedom and justice affirmed by the U.S. Constitution and its amendments. Yet starkly contrasted is an America dismayed and torn by church shootings, school shootings, racist nationalism, tribalism, and the fatiguing tensions of identity politics. This is regrettable to people of faith as well as to every citizen who is committed to “one nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.”
Observe how certain political and religious currents in American society today bring to mind the “Know-Nothing” politics of the mid-1800s. The “Know-Nothing-Party” was pledged to defend American values and life-style from the potential of foreign domination on native-born Americans. American Protestants, in particular, feared the influence of immigrant European traditionalists and not least the increasing influx of Roman Catholics. This kind of hostile American nativism is not just a historical footnote, but lingers on in polarizing debates about immigration, white nationalism, identity politics, and racial and religious equality. Moreover, during the present election season Republicans and Democrats debate tooth and nail about border control and healthcare, yet neither party has brought forward detailed proposals and moderating attitudes that effectively move our governing process and our body politic beyond vitriolic stagnation and suspicion.

So the tragedy in Pittsburgh is not only a marker of anti-Semitism, but is another mark of the discord and debate that press the search for America’s soul. Our Founding Fathers recognized that diverse people with competing self-interests can either break or make a nation. They knew well the pitfalls of human avarice and tyranny, but anticipated (more than they realized) that constitutional divisions of power and democratic controls could preserve this nation in civil harmony despite and even because of differences of religion and inheritance. By the same token, many faith traditions recognize that civil harmony is a religious imperative. In 1995, my Lutheran denomination made common cause with the Montana Association of Jewish Communities, not because we share the same religious doctrines about God and salvation, but because we share renewed respect for each other that does not bow to stereotypes and intolerance. Moreover, we stated that “We need not share a common creed to share common deeds that enhance human welfare and strengthen the moral fabric of society.”

Such is the kind of language and commitment that advances both faith and nation. Whatever
our religion or biological and social inheritance; whether we are conservative, liberal,Republican, Democrat, or Independent; whether we drive Fords, Chevys, or bicycles; we need not share a common creed to share common deeds of justice, respect, and maybe even love. This election season is a fitting time to deepen these foundations of our common life and prove-up the search for America’s soul.

(The Rev. Dr. Paul Seastrand is a retired pastor with the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, and a member of the Billings “Montana Interfaith Network.”)

TRAGEDY AT ETZ CHAYIM, PITTSBURGH

October 28, 2018
Congregation Aitz Chaim (The Great Falls Hebrew Association) would like to extend our deepest sympathy and condolences to our fellow Jews in Pittsburgh. We join you if not physically, spiritually, during this time of mourning and Shiva. As we recite the ancient words of the Kaddish, we pray that the source of comfort will comfort all those who mourn, and we send peace to all those who are bereaved.
*************
October 28, 2018
Dear Members and Friends of Har Shalom,

Today, our deepest condolences go to the people of Etz Chayim, Pittsburgh. I would like to invite you to attend a vigil at Har Shalom on Sunday October 28 at 4:30 pm. Let us mourn and pray for peace together.

We are reeling between anger and sorrow about the Pittsburgh synagogue shooting. My heart breaks for the families of those who lost loved ones and for the injuries of those who were wounded. I am exceedingly grateful to professional law enforcement for their dedication in the face of danger. At the same time, I am enraged that we have to suffer deadly, bigoted actions directed at our beloved Jewish people.

Although we are far from Pittsburgh, we feel the reverberations of this horrific mass shooting. Some of us are the children of Holocaust survivors. Some of us know that the Nazis killed our relatives in Eastern Europe. We remember, and it is painful. It is unspeakably despicable that innocent people are murdered because of their identity, simply because they are Jewish, especially in a house of worship, from a religious tradition that originated the concept of “sanctuary”. I will not hide in the face of anti-Semitism. We must affirm and celebrate our identity in a free society.

On the matter of security and the threat of copy-cat events, I spoke with the Missoula Police Department this morning. The officers in our zone will do extra drive–bys and will park in front of Har Shalom to fill out reports and make follow-up phone calls. I also communicated with our local police intelligence officer, who assures us that monitoring of local hate groups does not indicate any specific, immediate threat. I urge you to get in touch with me if you would like to share your concerns. Many, many thanks to all our non-Jewish friends who have called or written to express their solidarity. It means so much to us.

Meanwhile, we can do these things: (1) Please come to the vigil tomorrow, Sunday October 28 at 4:30 pm, and (2) Please work to undo the damage caused by hate-filled rhetoric and false conspiracy theories by modeling the opposite behavior, working in advocacy roles for our highest values, and voting.
Laurie Franklin
Spiritual Leader and Senior Rabbinic Intern
Har Shalom/Missoula, MT
************
October 28, 2018
We never begin the day thinking we will learn of a tragedy, especially on Shabbat. However, we were confronted this morning with the news that shattered the very peace and rest we seek on this holy day.

As many of you are already aware, Tree of Life Synagogue in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (home to several large and diverse Jewish communities) was in the middle of Shabbat morning services when they were attacked by an active shooter who was apparently driven by extreme anti-Semitic hatred.

It is easy to be blindsided, scared and even confused by this event. The United States is one of the safest nations in the world for Jews to live throughout the history of our people. This is why the actions carried out this morning are such a sobering reminder that bigotry, hatred, and intolerance continue to be evils we face as Jews along with others discriminated against for just trying to be who they are.

We join with other Jewish Communities around the United States and the world in mourning with the Tree of Life Congregation in Pittsburgh. Many of us at CBA have personal ties to Pittsburgh or the area.

Although our sympathetic prayers seem meager in the wake of the enormous weight of this tragedy, it joins into a bigger outpouring of love, warmth and solidarity from the other Jewish communities along with the greater United States Community. This wave reminds us that light and warmth will banish darkness; without exception. As opposed to letting this event close us off from our neighbors and make us suspicious of strangers – let us take the opportunity to get to know the people around our community better. We fear what we do not know.

One thing is certain. We will not let fear dictate how we worship or live our lives. Please note that we will continue as planned with our showing of “There Are Jews Here” at the Synagogue tomorrow. We hope to see you there!

With sorrow and a prayer for everlasting peace,
Jill Salsbury
President, Congregation Beth Aaron
************
October 28, 2018
Dear friends,

Shabbos in Bozeman ended a short time ago and I turned my phone on to see the horrific images out of the Tree of Life – Or L’Simcha Synagogue in Pittsburgh. The Torah says that upon hearing of the untimely passing of his sons Nadav and Avihu, Aaron, Moses’ brother and High Priest, was silent. There are times where speechlessness is the sound of a deep cry, a bitter heartbreak and an unfathomable tragedy being experienced.

Please join me tomorrow at Congregation Beth Shalom, Bozeman, at 3:30 PM for a community gathering in memory of our brothers and sisters in Pittsburgh and join us this upcoming Shabbos morning November 3rd for a Shabbat Prayer for Pittsburgh as our prayers and the sermon will be dedicated to Pittsburgh and our way forward as a Jewish community.

I know that so many of you are scared, broken and angry. The words of King David must always reverberate in our minds “The guardian of Israel neither slumbers nor sleeps” and may He protect our people wherever they are and may He bring comfort to the Synagogue and greater Pittsburgh community and the families who are mourning the loss of their loved ones.

Shavua Tov,

Rabbi Chaim Bruk
Director/Spiritual Leader
Chabad Lubavitch of Montana

JEWISH CEMETERIES IN MONTANA

From: Brian Schnitzer
Sent: Tuesday, June 26, 2018 3:46 PM
Subject: MAJCo – Jewish Cemeteries In Montana

Last week the Montana Historical Society sponsored, with the help of National Park Service funding, a seminar on cemetery preservation. Helena’s Home of Peace cemetery featured significantly in several of the presentations and was one of the stops on the Helena historic cemeteries tour.

Home of Peace, owned and managed by the Home of Peace Cemetery Association, was established in 1867. It is Helena’s oldest active cemetery and the oldest Jewish cemetery in Montana.

(Papers exist suggesting as the Virginia City mining camp prepared to become an organized town in the mid-1860’s, its founders designated an area in its planned cemetery as “The Hebrew Cemetery.” There are no monuments in the designated area and no documentation of its having ever been purchased by any Jewish community. Although Ground Penetrating Radar suggests many internments, it is thought the area was used by Virginia City for mass burials during one of its later epidemics.)

I, therefore, know only the particulars of two specifically Jewish cemeteries in Montana. I believe we also have cemeteries in Butte and Great Falls, but I do not know their particulars. If you are aware of additional active or inactive Jewish cemeteries, please reply with that information. “Reply All,” so the information can be shared and not duplicated.

Beth Aaron Cemetery
Active
Congregation Beth Aaron
Billings

Home of Peace
Active
Home of Peace Cemetery Association
Helena

PLEASE MARK YOUR CALENDARS: CHANUKAH AT THE CAPITOL

We have firmed up plans for our annual Chanukah candle lighting for Monday, December 18th, 30 Kislev, beginning at noon in the Capitol rotunda in Helena. Governor Steve Bullock is scheduled to join us.

I will schedule a room for a meeting of the MAJCo representatives. More information will follow soon about agenda.
Bert Chessin
406.531.5193
Missoula, Montana