ALWAYS REMEMBER …

THE ONE MINUTE HAGGADAH

Only Technion-Israel Institute of Technology students can do this – the Passover story in just one minute!

Submitted by Jerry Weissman

MORE CORN

Q: Define: Genius
A: A “C” student with a Jewish mother.

Q: What do you call the steaks ordered by ten Jewish men?
A: Fillet minyan.

Q: What kind of cheese melts on a piece of matza to make a passover pizza?
A: Matzarello

Q: what does a Jewish pirate say?
A: Ahoy vey!

How does Moses make his tea? Hebrews it. I’m serious. That Israeli how he does it.

Q: Who was the greatest financier in the Bible?
A: Noah – he was floating his stock while everyone else was in liquidation.

Q: What kind of man was Boaz before he got married?
A: Ruth-less.

Q: What kind of motor vehicles are in the Bible?
A: God drove Adam and Eve out of the Garden in a Fury.

Q: Who was the greatest comedian in the Bible?
A: Samson – he brought the house down.

Q: What is one of the first things that Adam and Eve did after they were kicked out?
A: They raised Cain.

Q: What excuse did Adam give to his children as to why he no longer lived in Eden?
A: Your mother ate us out of house and home.

Q. Where is the first baseball game in the Bible?
A. In the big inning. Eve stole first, Adam stole second. Cain struck out Abel. The Giants and the Angels were rained out.

Q. How did Adam and Eve feel when expelled from the Garden of Eden?
A. They were really put out.

Q. The ark was built in 3 stories, and the top story had a window to let light in, but how did they get light to the bottom 2 stories?
A. They used floodlights.

Q. Why didn’t Noah go fishing?
A. He only had two worms!

Q. Who is the greatest baby-sitter mentioned in the Bible?
A. David: he rocked Goliath to sleep.

Q. Why was Goliath so surprised when David hit him with a slingshot?
A. The thought had never entered his head before.

Q. If Goliath is resurrected, would you like to tell him the joke about David and Goliath?
A. No, he already fell for it once.

Q. Which area of the Land of Israel was especially wealthy?
A. The area around the Jordan: the banks were always overflowing.

Q. Where is the first tennis match mentioned in the Bible?
A. When Joseph served in Pharaoh’s court.

Q. Which Biblical character had no parents?
A. Joshua, son of Nun.

TERIYAKI MADNESS: OPENING APRIL 3, 2017 (7 Nissan, 5777)

Teriyaki Madness
Address: 1710 10th Ave S, Great Falls, MT 59405
Business Hours: Open 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. daily
Phone Number (406) 315-3388
Japanese,
Asian Fusion,
Hawaiian

Hello Great Falls! Big bowls of Teriyaki Madness here!

Teriyaki Madness is known for its Seattle-style teriyaki, serving big bowls of bold, delicious flavors made-to-order with fresh ingredients. All dishes use all-natural meats that are marinated and grilled with noodles or three kinds of rice and fresh vegetables and served with one of seven home-made sauces. Customers can choose a bowl or plate and then load it with teriyaki chicken, steak or tofu and add yakisoba noodles, white, brown or fried rice. With fresh-cut veggies, the bowls are customized as low-carb and gluten-friendly, with the average price per bowl around $8.

Meet the Business Owner Aaron Weissman

“I am excited to bring big, delicious bowls of teriyaki to Great Falls!  Try our food and I am sure that you will be hooked.”

GRAND OPENING: APRIL 5-6, 2017

Takes Reservations No
Take-out Yes
Accepts Credit Cards Yes
Accepts Apple Pay No
Accepts Bitcoin No
Parking Private Lot
Bike Parking Yes
Wheelchair Accessible Yes
Alcohol No
Outdoor Seating Yes
Wi-Fi Free
Has TV Yes
Dogs Allowed No
Waiter Service No
Caters Yes
Offers Military Discount Yes
Gender Neutral Restrooms Yes

http://www.krtv.com/story/35046444/sneak-peek-teriyaki-madness-in-great-falls#.WOIRMD5Ii04ddress:

YAHRZEITS — APRIL, 2017, NISSAN–IYAR, 5777

RAM’S HORN POLICY FOR LISTING YAHRZEIT MEMORIALS:!
Yahrzeit memorials are listed by consecutive Gregorian month, date, and year, if known, or at the beginning of the list for one calendar year following the date of passing.

Compiled by Aitz Chaim over many years, this list is maintained by the Ram’s Horn. Please send any corrections or additions to editor@aitzchaim.com
May the source of peace send peace to all who mourn, and comfort to all who are bereaved.

Name of
Deceased
English Date of Passing Hebrew Date of Passing Deceased Relationship to
Congregant
Lydia (Leah) Bailey Mar 31, 2017 4 Nissan, 5777 Mother of Karen (Chaya) Semple
Marion Kelman May 19, 2016 11 Iyyar, 5776 Sister-in-law of Evelyn Kelman
Sheldon Maznek May 20, 2016 12 Iyar, 5776 Brother of Evelyn Kelman
Sherri Estil Hopperstad Apr 4, 2003 2 Nissan, 5763
Sandra Albachari Apr 4, 2005 24 Adar II, 5765 Mother of Julie Nice
Margaret Slate Breslauer Apr 6, 1969 18 Nissan, 5729 Mother of Bruce Breslauer
Sid Kelman Apr 6, 2003 4 Nissan, 5763 Brother-in-law of Evelyn Kelman
Naomi Bay Kaplan Apr 8, 2007 20 Nissan, 5767 Grandmother of Kai Nealis
Heidi Espelin Apr 11, 1986 2 Nissan, 5746 Sister of Dawn Schandelson
Esther Nagel Lyndon Apr 12, 2012 18 Adar, 5772 Aunt of Meriam Nagel
Elaine Thall Apr 15, 2006 17 Nisan, 5766 Mother of Terry Thall
Maurice Weissman Apr 16, 1991 2 Iyyar, 5751 Father of Jerry Weissman
Gary Cohn Apr 17, 1984 15 Nissan, 5744 Brother of Arlyne Reichert
Harry Wasserman Apr 19, 2003 17 Nissan, 5763 Father of Miriam Wolf
Irving Greenfield Apr 28, 2000 23 Nissan, 5760

Corn for Passover

EDITOR’S NOTE: Didn’t someone decide recently that corn was Kosher for Passover?

Our Great Falls community Seder is coming up. There might be some corny jokes told but probably not. Here is the only one running this morning.

Who was the best businesswoman in the Bible? Pharaoh’s daughter! She pulled a profit out of the water!

See you at the Seder!

Jerry Weissman

PESACH IS COMING SOON! PLEASE RSVP ASAP!

The annual Aitz Chaim community Seder will be held Tuesday evening, April 11, at The O’Haire Motor Inn, 17 7th Street South at 5:30pm. That is in just 2 short weeks! Please get your reservations in ASAP! We need to get the count to the caterer by April 6.

Please send your RSVP to Laura Weiss at weissbill@bresnan.net.

The meal will include all the traditional fixings and a multi course dinner including matzo ball soup, salad, brisket, chicken, potato, vegetable, and dessert. Cost will be $28 per member adult, $38 per non-member adult. Children under 13 are half price. A vegetarian main course can be made available upon advance request. The Seder will be led (by popular demand) by Aaron Weissman.

Payment is preferred in advance unless other arrangements have been made. Please be aware you will be responsible for the cost if you do not attend and have not canceled prior to April 6.

Looking forward to seeing you there!

Submitted by Congregation President Laura Weiss

GREAT FALLS INTERFAITH ASSOCIATION MINUTES

Great Falls Inter-Faith Association
March 23rd, 2017

Focus: Mental Health, Suicide Prevention, and Related Issues

Pastor Ray opened with a reading from Isaiah and a prayer.

Greg Tilton – The Montana Strategic Suicide prevention plan has been in place since 2001, rates have not declined any, we are still well above the national average. Montana had 555 suicides between January 1, 2014, and March 1, 2016. Of those, 440 were male and 115 female.
You can watch the KRTV episode of “Face the State” here: http://www.krtv.com/story/34540254/suicide-awareness-and-prevention-in-montana
In 2012, a Federal plan was issued, which the Montana plan uses as guidance. The marrying of public health and behavioral health is vital to this plan, however, it overlooks the importance of spiritual health. They are looking for a few spiritual leaders to “close the gap” in the plan.
KRTV is having a year-long program for this issue, there will be a continuous link on the web page. Veteran suicide is a huge problem, and a great many of the suicides are Vets suffering from PTSD.
Greg believes that the missing component to the Suicide Presentation plan is spiritual health.
Behavioral health programs are extremely expensive, but volunteerism isn’t, and in some ways is more beneficial than other programs.

They meet the third Monday of the month, from 3-5, at the Chamber of Commerce conference room.
For more information, contact Ben Wight, card attached below.

Jim McCormick – Pastor Ray made a list of all organizations who are, or might adopt a school. There are still schools that need help from faith-based organizations. They need funds, food, and volunteers. The best way to get a hold of the schools is to contact the principals, and the best way to get churches is to contact the church secretary.

Kristy Stoop – Violence prevention week is April 3rd – 9th. More info is on the website: https://dandelionfoundation.org/events/

Submitted by Stephen Boyd, recording secretary GFIA.

AIPAC’s RESPECT FOR ISRAELI VOTERS

AIPAC’s respect for Israeli voters
BY DAVID SUISSA |
PUBLISHED IN THE JEWISH JOURNAL MAR 14, 2017 |
OPINION

EDITOR’S NOTE: David Suissa is President of Tribe Media/Jewish Journal, where he has been writing a weekly column on the Jewish world since 2006. In 2015, he was awarded first prize for “Editorial Excellence” by the American Jewish Press Association. Prior to Tribe Media, David was founder and CEO of Suissa Miller Advertising,
a marketing firm named “Agency of the Year” by USA Today. He sold his company in 2006 to devote himself full time to his first passion: Israel and the Jewish world. David was born in Casablanca, Morocco, grew up in Montreal, and now lives in Los Angeles with his five children.

________________________________________
The theme of this year’s AIPAC Policy Conference — “Many Voices, One Mission” — speaks to the importance the Israel lobby group places on attracting a plurality of voices. This focus on bipartisanship has long been AIPAC’s bread and butter. By being sensitive to the democratic choices of Israeli voters, whether on the left or the right, AIPAC always had what looked like a reasonable and fail-safe strategy.
Indeed, for many years, that approach worked to strengthen AIPAC’s bipartisan image. When Israel was led by aggressive peacemakers, AIPAC could appeal to liberals, and when it was led by hawks, AIPAC could appeal to the right. Generally speaking, as Israel went, AIPAC went.

The problem for AIPAC is that about 15 years ago, after the failure of Camp David II and the ensuing Second Intifada, Israel went right and hasn’t looked back. Israeli voters, for better or for worse, lost faith in the “peace first” approach and fell back on “security first.”

This shift was reinforced by Israel’s disengagement from Gaza in 2005. The typical Israeli reaction was: “We called their bluff and gave them land and all we got was war.” As a result, the Israeli peace camp lost much of its credibility. Long gone were the days when the world media would cover Israeli prime ministers like Ehud Barak, Yitzhak Rabin and Ehud Olmert busily engaging in peace talks.
Those talks may have failed, but they provided good optics for AIPAC, as it enabled the group to connect with peace-obsessed American liberals. In recent years, however, behind a right-wing government that has failed to generate any peace momentum, AIPAC has found it harder to maintain that connection. J Street, which feels no obligation to respect the choices of Israeli voters, has happily exploited that gap.
The fact that AIPAC honors that core Israeli reality is an asset, not a liability.
AIPAC is faced with a tough balancing act. Although it has taken heat from some Jews on the right who feel it doesn’t go far enough, its biggest challenge is to maintain a connection with the new generation of liberal American Jews.

This challenge is magnified by the fact
that American liberal Jews and Israeli Jews in general are going in opposite directions. While the peace camp may have shrunk in Israel, in America it is louder than ever. Liberal Jews not only idolize peace but they place most of the blame for its absence on Israel. They may be overly simplistic and idealistic, but their presence is real and growing.

So, is there a chance for AIPAC to attract more of these J Street Jews?
Only if it can create a deeper empathy for Israeli voters. It’s one thing to develop your political views while sipping cappuccinos
 on the Upper West Side or in Beverly Hills; it’s another to develop those views while calculating the 15-second distance to a bomb shelter in Sderot or Haifa. The fact that AIPAC honors that core Israeli reality is an asset, not a liability.

At this year’s conference, AIPAC will showcase what it calls “the various communities that shape and define our broad, bipartisan movement.” In my mind, the community that most shapes and defines AIPAC is the broad plurality of Israeli voters who are torn between the dream of peace and the reality of war.
In his keynote address at the 2016 AJC Global Forum, my friend and frequent AIPAC speaker Yossi Klein Halevi captured that dilemma:

“We face vexing challenges we could not have imagined in 1967. How can Israel safely extricate itself from the wrenching dilemma of ruling another people? A majority of Israelis know we must end that occupation — now approaching its 50th year — but fear the absence of a credible partner for a durable peace.

“Much of the international community trivializes our dilemma by insisting that Israel’s choice is between occupation and peace — ignoring the history of Palestinian rejectionism and a poisoned educational system that teaches Palestinian children to hate Israel and deny any Jewish connection to the land.

“Israel’s critics all but ignore the terrorist groups on our borders — Hezbollah and Hamas and Islamic State and the Iranian Revolutionary Guards — and speak of solving the Palestinian conflict as though Israel were an island in the South Pacific.”

AIPAC understands that Israel is not an island in the South Pacific, because it has always stayed connected to the complicated reality and hard choices of Israeli voters. Those voters live on the front lines, and if you ask me, 
it is their voices that American Jews of the left and right should hear first.

Suggested by Jerry weissman

YAHRZEITS — MARCH, 2017, ADAR–NISAN, 5777

RAM’S HORN POLICY FOR LISTING YAHRZEIT MEMORIALS:!
Yahrzeit memorials are listed by consecutive Gregorian month, date, and year, if known, or at the beginning of the list for one calendar year following the date of passing.

Compiled by Aitz Chaim over many years, this list is maintained by the Ram’s Horn. Please send any corrections or additions to editor@aitzchaim.com
May the source of peace send peace to all who mourn, and comfort to all who are bereaved.

Name of
Deceased
English Date of Passing Hebrew Date of Passing Deceased Relationship to
Congregant
Marion Kelman May 19, 2016 11 Iyyar, 5776 Sister-in-law of Evelyn Kelman
Sheldon Maznek May 20, 2016 12 Iyar, 5776 Brother of Evelyn Kelman
Edith Semple Mar 2, 2010 17 Adar, 5770 Mother of Doug Semple
Sophia Weissman Mar 12, 1967 30 Adar I, 5727 Grandmother of Jerry Weissman
Benjamin Barrett Mar 13, 1968 13 Adar I, 5728 Grandfather of Nadyne Weissman
Sylvia Fineman Mar 13, 2009 18 Adar, 5769 Mother of Robert Fineman; Aunt of Jerry Weissman
Pauline Eichner Mar 14, 1991 28 Adar I, 5751 Mother of Jerry Eichner
Marcia Eisenberg Mar 15, 1992 10 Adar II, 5752 Mother of Sharon Eisenberg
Allan B. Silverstein Mar 16, 2012 22 Adar, 5772 Father of Errol Silverstein
Fanny Drellich Mar 17, 1930 17 Adar I, 5690 Grandmother of Arlyne Reichert
Bernadette Nice Mar 23, 2014 21 Adar II, 5774 Mother-in-law of Julie Nice
Morris Schandelson Mar 28, 1988 10 Nissan, 5748 Father of Arnold Schandelson
Lillian Gissen Mar 30 Mother of Marion Kelman
Harry Crombie Mar 31, 1967 19 Adar II, 5727 Father of Arleen Heintzelman