Category Archives: Ram’s Horn

UPDATE: CEMETERY CLEANUP

Since the weather forecast is predicting rain or snow on Sunday, May 2, we have postponed the cemetery cleanup for two weeks. We are tentatively planning it for Sunday, May 16, at 10:00 A.M. weather permitting. So bring a lawn mower or a weed whacker or the willingness to run one, or trash bags or a rake or whatever you have around, plus a sack lunch and something to drink for yourself.
Eaton Road Cemetery Driving Directions
Satellite view of Eaton Road Cemetery

YAHRZEITS — MAY, 2021

RAM’S HORN POLICY FOR LISTING YAHRZEIT MEMORIALS:
Yahrzeit memorials are listed by consecutive Gregorian month, date, and year, if known, or at the beginning of the list for one calendar year following the date of passing.

Compiled by Aitz Chaim over many years, this list is maintained by the Ram’s Horn. Please send any corrections or additions to editor@aitzchaim.com
May the source of peace send peace to all who mourn, and may we be a comfort to all who are bereaved.

Name of
Deceased
English Date of Passing Hebrew Date of Passing Deceased Relationship to
Congregant
Arleen Heintzelman Nov 19, 2020 3 Kislev, 5781
Ada Handler May 1, 1980 15 Iyyar, 5740 Grandmother of Wendy Weissman
Gary Ray Holsclaw May 5, 2020 11 Iyyar, 5780 Son of Arleen Heintzelman
Florence (Flo) Barrett May 8, 1996 19 Iyyar, 5756 Aunt of Nadyne Weissman
Donald Goldman May 14, 2018 29 Iyyar, 5778 Father of Abby Drew, Grandfather of Ceecee Drew
Marion Kelman May 19, 2016 11 Iyyar, 5776 Sister-in-law of Evelyn Kelman
Toby Jane Weissman May 20, 1941 23 Iyyar, 5701 Daughter of Maurice and Perle Weissman, Sister of Jerry, Irving, Lauren, and Susan Weissman
Sheldon Maznek May 20, 2016 12 Iyar, 5776 Brother of Evelyn Kelman
Bessie Stiegler May 23, 1998 27 Iyyar, 5758 Aunt of Nadyne Weissman
Bette Weissman May 27, 2010 16 Sivan, 5770 Grandmother of David Weissman, mother of Jeff Weissman, Patricia Philipps, Ted Weissman, Sally Weissman and Gale Rietmann.

PLEASE MARK YOUR CALENDARS FOR THIS UPCOMING EVENT: RESUMING MONTHLY SERVICES

Due to the pandemic, monthly services were temporarily suspended. Now we are taking tentative steps toward resuming some activities in an effort to get back to more “normal” life.

With this in mind, we would like to resume the lay services led by Devorah Werner the first Friday of the month, May 7, at 6:00 P.M. at the Bethel, with the caveat that if the weather is inclement we will postpone it to the second Friday of the month. We would like to hold our first gathering outside in the courtyard behind the Bethel. There are some picnic tables out there, but you may prefer to bring your own folding chair. We request that you observe state and CDC guidelines regarding the pandemic protocol — wear masks, social distance, do not bring food or drink to share.

The address for the Bethel is 1009 18th Avenue Southwest. click here for map and directions.

Hope to see as many of you there as possible.

PLEASE MARK YOUR CALENDARS FOR THIS UPCOMING EVENT: CEMETERY CLEANUP

Please join us on Sunday, May 2, at 10:00 A.M. at the Eaton Road Cemetery to help clean up. After not being able to assemble do to the pandemic, and due to the winter and the recent winds we have had, the cemetery is in dire need of a refresh. Please bring your lawn mowers, weed whackers, or the desire to run one, or whatever else you can to help with the cleanup effort, plus a sack lunch and something to drink for yourself. Many hands will make light work, and it will be so nice to finally see you all in person, face to face.  Thank you.

Google Maps directions

Satellite view of Eaton Road Cemetery

YAHRZEITS — IYYAR, 5781

RAM’S HORN POLICY FOR LISTING YAHRZEIT MEMORIALS:
Yahrzeit memorials are listed by consecutive Hebrew month, date, and year, if known, or at the beginning of the list for one calendar year following the date of passing.

Compiled by Aitz Chaim over many years, this list is maintained by the Ram’s Horn. Please send any corrections or additions to editor@aitzchaim.com
May the source of peace send peace to all who mourn, and may we be a comfort to all who are bereaved.

Name of Deceased Hebrew Date of Passing Deceased Relationship to Congregant
Arleen Heintzelman 3 Kislev, 5781
Maurice Weissman 2 Iyyar, 5751 Father of Jerry, Irving, toby Jane, Lauren, and Susan Weissman
Marion Kelman 11 Iyyar, 5776 Sister-in-law of Evelyn Kelman
Gary Ray Holsclaw 11 Iyyar, 5780 Son of Arleen Heintzelman
Sheldon Maznek 12 Iyar, 5776 Brother of Evelyn Kelman
Ada Handler 15 Iyyar, 5740 Grandmother of Wendy Weissman
Florence (Flo) Barrett 19 Iyyar, 5756 Aunt of Nadyne Weissman
Toby Jane Weissman 23 Iyyar, 5701 Daughter of Maurice and Perle Weissman; Sister of Jerry, Irving, Lauren, Susan Weissman
Bessie Stiegler 27 Iyyar, 5758 Aunt of Nadyne Weissman
Donald Goldman 29 Iyyar, 5778 Father of Abbee Drew, Grandfather of Ceecee Drew

YAHRZEITS — APRIL, 2021

RAM’S HORN POLICY FOR LISTING YAHRZEIT MEMORIALS:
Yahrzeit memorials are listed by consecutive Gregorian month, date, and year, if known, or at the beginning of the list for one calendar year following the date of passing.

Compiled by Aitz Chaim over many years, this list is maintained by the Ram’s Horn. Please send any corrections or additions to editor@aitzchaim.com
May the source of peace send peace to all who mourn, and may we be a comfort to all who are bereaved.

Name of
Deceased
English Date of Passing Hebrew Date of Passing Deceased Relationship to
Congregant
Arleen Heintzelman Nov 19, 2020 3 Kislev, 5781
Gary Ray Holsclaw May 5, 2020 11 Iyyar, 5780 Son of Arleen Heintzelman
FRANCES WALTMAN Apr 1, 2018 16 Nisan, 5778 Mother of Marjorie Feldman
Sherri Estil Hopperstad Apr 4, 2003 2 Nisan, 5763
Sandra Albachari Apr 4, 2005 24 Adar II, 5765 Mother of Julie Nice
Margaret Slate Breslauer Apr 6, 1969 18 Nisan, 5729 Mother of Bruce Breslauer
Sid Kelman Apr 6, 2003 4 Nisan, 5763 Brother-in-law of Evelyn Kelman
Naomi Bay Kaplan Apr 8, 2007 20 Nisan, 5767 Grandmother of Kai Nealis
Bill Hinton Apr 9, 2019 4 Nisan, 5779 Husband of Susan Hinton
Heidi Espelin Apr 11, 1986 2 Nisan, 5746 Sister of Dawn Schandelson
Esther Nagel Lyndon Apr 12, 2012 18 Adar, 5772 Aunt of Meriam Nagel
Elaine Thall Apr 15, 2006 17 Nisan, 5766 Mother of Terry Thall
Maurice Weissman Apr 16, 1991 2 Iyyar, 5751 Father of Jerry Weissman
Janet Woodcock Getzenberg Apr 16, 2005 7 Nisan, 5765 Mother of Anne Getzenberg
Gary Cohn Apr 17, 1984 15 Nisan, 5744 Brother of Arlyne Reichert
Harry Wasserman Apr 19, 2003 17 Nisan, 5763 Father of Miriam Wolf
Irving Greenfield Apr 28, 2000 23 Nissan, 5760

YOM HASHOAH PROGRAMMING FOR MARCH OF THE LIVING

The International March of the Living will hold a Virtual March on Holocaust Remembrance Day led by Israel’s President Reuven Rivlin, Holocaust survivors, Jerusalem Mayor Moshe Lion, Jewish Agency Chair Isaac Herzog, KKL Chair Avraham Duvdevani, and Rabbi Israel Meir Lau paying tribute to medical staff.

Among the Holocaust survivors participating are those who survived due to the selfless acts of medical professionals. Participants in the Virtual March from across the globe were filmed using innovative 3D technology so they appear to be marching along the traditional March of the Living route at Auschwitz – Birkenau.

As a tribute to the medical professionals who risked their lives during the Holocaust, numerous medical associations around the globe, including the World Health Organization, as well as those on the forefront of the fight against COVID-19 will participate in this virtual program. Among those marching will be doctors, nurses, and paramedics. Also, marching will be Israel’s Coronavirus Commissioner Prof. Nachman Ash, 2nd generation to doctors during the Holocaust who is today leading physicians on Israel’s medical front against Covid-19, Prof. Idit Matot, Director of Anesthesia in Tel Aviv’s Ichilov Hospital and Galia Rahav Head of the Infectious Disease Unit and Laboratories at Sheba Medical Centre, Magen David Adom Director-General Eli Beer, and Haim Freund, CEO of Ezer Mitzion who is marching with his mother, Holocaust survivor Tzipora Freund.

Special for 2021 the International March of the Living will be airing a Virtual MARCH: (youtube link https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=akdIQv9M9dk). The Virtual March will air on Thursday, April 8, at 7 am PST and will be followed immediately by an online memorial ceremony with the first torch of remembrance lit by President Rivlin. All programming can be viewed following tge events as well on motl.org.

Israel’s President Reuven Rivlin said: “We all have a duty to pass on the memory of the Holocaust to future generations, not to forget, not to let it be forgotten. During this pandemic we are prevented from stepping on the accursed earth, saturated with the blood of six million of our people. Yet, we have vowed never to forget or let go. Technology allows us, each and every one of us, to participate in the March of Living without leaving home while contributing to the commemoration of the Holocaust and its victims. We must harness all the tools at our disposal to fight racism, anti-Semitism, attempts at denial. We must continue marching.”

“The fact that this is the second year that we will not march in the March of the Living on Holocaust Remembrance Day at the site of the Auschwitz-Birkenau extermination camps is difficult,” said March of the Living World Chair, Dr. Shmuel Rosenman and March of the Living President, Phyllis Greenberg Heideman. “However, will never stop the work of remembrance. This year we found a unique way to hold a virtual march in a way that brings us as close as possible to a feeling that cannot be explained in words. We will be in Auschwitz-Birkenau in spirit and soul, and we will be joined by millions of people around the world.”

Jewish Agency Chair Yitzhak Herzog: “The ‘March of the Living’ connects between those who learned about the Holocaust firsthand and those who did not; between the generation of survivors that is disappearing, and the younger generation that grew up around the world not knowing firsthand the story of the Holocaust and the struggle of the Jewish people as well as the predatory powers of racism and antisemitism.”

International March of the Living is the largest annual international Holocaust education program which, until the coronavirus outbreak in 2020, has taken place in Poland and Israel without interruption, since its establishment in 1988. Some 300,000 participants, including students from across the globe, have taken place in the March since.

Please be a part of the MARCH OF THE LIVING’s Annual Plaque Project as we do every year in Birkenau: http://nevermeansnever.com.

For Erev Yom Hashoah, Wednesday, April 7, 2021, 4:00 PM PST, join the Erev Yom Hashoah Educational Symposium: Medicine and Morality: Lessons from the Holocasut and COVID-19.

Presented by The Miller Center for Community Protection & Resilience, Rutgers University, International March of the Living and Maimonides Institute for Medicine, Ethics and the Holocaust, in cooperation with the USC Shoah Foundation.

The active participation of the medical community – those who took an oath to “first, do no harm,” – in the labeling, persecution, and mass murder of millions of those deemed unfit, represents one of the darkest periods not only in the history of medicine but in the history of humankind. Yet, even in the darkest times, one can always find the light. Stories of physicians who remained dedicated to healing and saving lives prove that the power and privilege of medicine can be an inspiration to us all.

Also at this Symposium, there will be a special performance by Grammy Award-Winning artist Miri Ben-Ari and the presentation of the Moral Courage in Medicine Award to Dr. Anthony Fauci.

All programming can be screened on motl.org

Marcia Tatz Wollner
Director, Western Region March of the Living
marcia@motlthewest.org
858-395-3590
http://www.motlthewest.org

EVERYTHING YOU HAVE ALWAYS WANTED TO KNOW ABOUT THE MAXWELL HOUSE HAGGADAH BUT WERE AFRAID TO ASK

How the Maxwell House Haggadah became a passover Tradition – April 7, 2020
The Maxwell House Haggadah is the most goyish part of Passover – April 3, 2020
Wonder why Maxwell House makes Passover Haggadot? You’re not alone. – March 30, 2018
Joseph Jacobs Advertising
One Hundred Years of the Maxwell House Haggadah – The Forward, March 23, 2013

HAPPY PESACH FROM RABBI RUZ

I want to take this opportunity to wish all my friends in Great Falls a most joyous Pesach! I miss seeing you all so much! I hope everyone is doing well, and that we will be able to see each other soon! Love, Rabbi Ruz
Sent from my iPhone

PASSOVER AND THE POWER OF JEWISH CONTINUITY, BY MARK GERSON

Passover and the Power of Jewish Continuity

By Mark Gerson
March 20, 2021 12:01 am ET

After hundreds of years of slavery, it is the Israelites’ final night in Egypt. They are ready to escape to freedom. Their leader, Moses, imparts a final piece of guidance, one that is also to serve as a lasting edict: He instructs them to tell their children about this Exodus from Egypt. But there are many different ways to tell a story, let alone one as rich, complex and dynamic as the Exodus. Moses didn’t offer precise instructions. So thousands of years ago, Jews created a book known as the Haggadah, which means “telling.”
The Haggadah serves as the script for the Passover Seder, the ritual meal that Jews around the world will celebrate on the night of March 27. As much as any other book, it has been responsible for assuring the continuity of Judaism. The Haggadah does this “horizontally,” by creating an experience that every Jew in the world shares at the same time, as well as “vertically” through history. If a 3rd-century Yemenite or an 18th-century Russian were to walk into a Seder in Miami or Tel Aviv today, they would know exactly what was going on and be able to participate.

If the Haggadah were just a holiday manual or a dinner program, it would have disappeared a long time ago. Instead, it offers a condensed compilation of centuries of wisdom—the Greatest Hits of Jewish Thought. It is one of the greatest guides ever written for living a meaningful, fulfilling and happy life.

Near the beginning of the Seder, for instance, the Haggadah declares: “All who are hungry, let them come and eat; all who are needy, let them come and celebrate Passover.” But why would we issue an invitation when the event has begun and everyone is seated?
The answer is that the invitation is addressed to those already present to bring a certain part of themselves. The Hebrew word for “face” is a plural, suggesting that each of us has many faces, many selves. The self being invited to the Seder isn’t the confident one, which even occasionally feels invulnerable. Rather, it is the self who, as Deuteronomy says, “does not live by bread alone” but needs to alleviate its spiritual and ethical hunger.
Because most Jews attend a Seder every year, it offers an occasion to contemplate our younger selves. We realize how different we are now from who we were in the past and acknowledge that our future self will say the same about our current self. We can create that future self with the guidance of the Haggadah.

One of the mechanisms for doing so is the most familiar food of the holiday—the matzah. When a significant amount of salt is added to yeast, the yeast doesn’t rise, and the result is the flat, crackerlike bread known as matzah. On the night before Passover, Jews purge their homes of bread and introduce the matzah in its place. It is an opportunity to ask: What in my life do I want to discard? What do I want to preserve, and what do I want to last forever—even after I am gone?

Thoughts about preservation and permanence naturally lead to the subject of education. One of the best teaching tools in the Haggadah is the Four Questions, which point out some of the differences between an ordinary meal and the Seder: for example, “On all other nights we eat any vegetables. Why on this night do we eat only bitter herbs?” The Four Questions are traditionally recited by a child and are intended to arouse the curiosity of children. Yet no child has ever leapt from their chair, exclaiming, “Wow! I can’t believe we are eating bitter herbs tonight! Tell me more about the Exodus!” No, because generic instruction does not inspire. As King Solomon advised, each child must be educated “according to his way.”

The Four Questions are in fact meant to invite children to ask more questions of their own. The 13th-century rabbi Zedekiah ben Abraham noted that the Seder plate should contain “toasted grains, types of sweets and fruits to entice the children and drive away their sleepiness so that they will see the change and ask questions.” In my own home, we throw marshmallows to children who ask good questions. Does a child like baseball? Put a pack of trading cards under their plate. Is a child mischievous? Whoopee cushions are kosher for Passover!

Before long, the Seder arrives at the ten plagues, which God used to punish Pharaoh for continuing to enslave the Israelites. The book of Exodus says that the first two plagues, blood and frogs, were “everywhere in Egypt.” But rather than attempt to get rid of the plagues, Pharaoh’s magicians exacerbated them by creating more blood and frogs. Why? Because Jew-haters are often willing to accept increased suffering if it means inflicting greater pain upon Jews. This explains why Hitler used his dwindling military resources in late 1944 to round up and kill the Jews of Hungary.

The Haggadah has enabled the Jews to tell the story of the Exodus to their children for more than 100 generations because it isn’t simply meant to be read. Rather, the Haggadah involves a combination of activities: listening, speaking, being heard and responding anew. It is truly a conversation, in which the participants converse with those at the same table, those at Seders all over the world and those who sat at Seders in the distant past.
It is counterintuitive that a conversation should guarantee continuity. After all, participants in a conversation can’t know where it will end up, let alone how it will change them. Yet it is the unpredictable vehicle of a conversation that has enabled the endurance of the Passover celebration. This is another vital lesson from Passover: The secret to stability is structured dynamism. No wonder Jews celebrate Passover, the Festival of Freedom, at an event called the Seder, which means “order.” That miraculous balance, curated by the Haggadah, has kept the Jewish people on the same page generation after generation.
—This essay is adapted from Mr. Gerson’s new book “The Telling: How Judaism’s Essential Book Reveals the Meaning of Life,” published this month by St. Martin’s Press.
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Appeared in the March 20, 2021, print edition as ‘Passover and The Power of Jewish Continuity.’

Have a zissen Pesach! Jerry Weissman