Category Archives: October

YAHRZEIT OF LEONARD COHEN, 18 CHESHVAN


The second Yahrzeit (anniversary of the passing) of Leonard Cohen, one of the greatest Jewish poet-songwriters of the 20th century, was observed on October 27th, 2018.

As a tribute to his legacy, here is one of his most famous songs, Hallelujah, with the Hebrew lyrics of Psalm 150 which is recited daily in Jewish prayer.

May the memory of Leonard Cohen be for an eternal blessing.

Cantor Azi Schwartz of Park Avenue Synagogue
Arrangement: Raymond Goldstein
Music Director: Colin Fowler
Cello: Alexander Scheirele
Production Manager: Gil Smuskowitz
Recording engineer and audio editing: Doug Yoel

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A LETTER TO AITZ CHAIM, GREAT FALLS

To the members of Aitz Chaim:

I write as the Bishop of the Lutherans in Montana, deeply grieving the massacre at Tree of Life Synagogue, and standing in solidarity with the Jewish community.

Christians in general and Lutherans in particular have had a poor track record when it comes to anti-semitism and its tragic consequences. Our tradition has been associated with the justification of the Holocaust, and we continue to repent that.

In 1994, our denomination joined the Lutheran World Federation in repudiating and repenting anti-semitism, saying: “We recognize in anti-Semitism a contradiction and affront to the Gospel, a violantion of our hope and calling, and we pledge this church to oppose the deadly working of such bigotry, both within our own circls and in the society around us.”

In 1995, our church in Montana, the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, entered into an agreement with the Montana Association of Jewish Communities, pledging mutual support, education and work together for the good of all God’s people. In 2015, with representatives of MAJCO present, we Lutherans unanimously re-affirmed the agreement, pledging solidarity and prayer.

Lutheran congregations across Montana had the Jewish community in prayer during Sunday worship. We deeply regret the increased acts of anti-Semitism in our country, and pledge to work together for peace and harmony and justice for all people.

In Great Falls, where I live, Congregation Aitz Chaim has a special relationship with my congregation, Bethel Lutheran. Bethel serves as home for the Great Falls Jewish Community, even moving the youth group off site so as not to disturb the high holy days. It is a way that we can be in relationship with one another. We are so glad that you are part of our community.

As you grieve, please know that we grieve with you. And we stand ready to support you.

Shalom!

jessica Crist, Bishop

KEEPING THE FLAME ALIVE

Internationally acclaimed Israeli violinist and educator Lior Kaminetsky visited Great Falls with Soul Train in 2010 on a tour through rural parts of the United States. One of his passions is to create a documentary about rural Jewish congregations. Here is the trailer for the film, along with some other links that may be of interest.

ELCA PRESIDING BISHOP RESPONDS TO TREE OF LIFE SHOOTING IN PITTSBURGH

October 27, 2018

Dear Sisters and Brothers,
I write to you with a broken heart – for the lives lost, wounded, and shattered by horrific hatred and violence at Tree of Life Congregation this morning. We join our Jewish neighbors and enter into mourning for all that has been lost. In our grief, God is our comfort. “The Lord is near to the brokenhearted, and saves the crushed in spirit” (Psalm 34:18).

From Pittsburgh to Portland, and around the world, Jews are living in fear. Anti-Semitism is on the rise. Public acts of hatred and bigotry against Jews are commonplace. As Christians, and particularly as Lutherans, we deplore and reject this bigotry. “We recognize in anti-Semitism a contradiction and affront to the Gospel, a violation of our hope and calling, and we pledge this church to oppose the deadly working of such bigotry, both within our own circles and in the society around us” (1994 Declaration of the ELCA to the Jewish Community).
We are reminded that hate-filled violence knows no bounds – whether a Sikh Temple in Oak Creek, a Christian church in Charleston, or a Jewish synagogue In Pittsburgh. As people of faith, we are bound together not only in our mourning, but also in our response.

Therefore, in this tender moment of grief, let us reach out to those whose hearts are most broken – our Jewish neighbors. I encourage you to contact your local synagogue, or your Jewish colleagues, friends, and family members, to share your words of care, support, love, and protection. There may be specific acts you might offer to demonstrate your care, such as when the members of Faith Lutheran Church surrounded Congregation Beth Israel of Chico, California, serving as Shomrim, or guardians, as they observed Yom Kippur following a hate crime in 2009.
Such simple acts can go a long way to demonstrate our love, as an extension of God’s love. As we seek to heal the brokenhearted, we are assured that God is near. There is no greater promise in the face of grief.

In peace,
The Rev. Elizabeth A. Eaton
Presiding Bishop, ELCA

TRAGEDY AT ETZ CHAYIM, PITTSBURGH

October 28, 2018
Congregation Aitz Chaim (The Great Falls Hebrew Association) would like to extend our deepest sympathy and condolences to our fellow Jews in Pittsburgh. We join you if not physically, spiritually, during this time of mourning and Shiva. As we recite the ancient words of the Kaddish, we pray that the source of comfort will comfort all those who mourn, and we send peace to all those who are bereaved.
*************
October 28, 2018
Dear Members and Friends of Har Shalom,

Today, our deepest condolences go to the people of Etz Chayim, Pittsburgh. I would like to invite you to attend a vigil at Har Shalom on Sunday October 28 at 4:30 pm. Let us mourn and pray for peace together.

We are reeling between anger and sorrow about the Pittsburgh synagogue shooting. My heart breaks for the families of those who lost loved ones and for the injuries of those who were wounded. I am exceedingly grateful to professional law enforcement for their dedication in the face of danger. At the same time, I am enraged that we have to suffer deadly, bigoted actions directed at our beloved Jewish people.

Although we are far from Pittsburgh, we feel the reverberations of this horrific mass shooting. Some of us are the children of Holocaust survivors. Some of us know that the Nazis killed our relatives in Eastern Europe. We remember, and it is painful. It is unspeakably despicable that innocent people are murdered because of their identity, simply because they are Jewish, especially in a house of worship, from a religious tradition that originated the concept of “sanctuary”. I will not hide in the face of anti-Semitism. We must affirm and celebrate our identity in a free society.

On the matter of security and the threat of copy-cat events, I spoke with the Missoula Police Department this morning. The officers in our zone will do extra drive–bys and will park in front of Har Shalom to fill out reports and make follow-up phone calls. I also communicated with our local police intelligence officer, who assures us that monitoring of local hate groups does not indicate any specific, immediate threat. I urge you to get in touch with me if you would like to share your concerns. Many, many thanks to all our non-Jewish friends who have called or written to express their solidarity. It means so much to us.

Meanwhile, we can do these things: (1) Please come to the vigil tomorrow, Sunday October 28 at 4:30 pm, and (2) Please work to undo the damage caused by hate-filled rhetoric and false conspiracy theories by modeling the opposite behavior, working in advocacy roles for our highest values, and voting.
Laurie Franklin
Spiritual Leader and Senior Rabbinic Intern
Har Shalom/Missoula, MT
************
October 28, 2018
We never begin the day thinking we will learn of a tragedy, especially on Shabbat. However, we were confronted this morning with the news that shattered the very peace and rest we seek on this holy day.

As many of you are already aware, Tree of Life Synagogue in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (home to several large and diverse Jewish communities) was in the middle of Shabbat morning services when they were attacked by an active shooter who was apparently driven by extreme anti-Semitic hatred.

It is easy to be blindsided, scared and even confused by this event. The United States is one of the safest nations in the world for Jews to live throughout the history of our people. This is why the actions carried out this morning are such a sobering reminder that bigotry, hatred, and intolerance continue to be evils we face as Jews along with others discriminated against for just trying to be who they are.

We join with other Jewish Communities around the United States and the world in mourning with the Tree of Life Congregation in Pittsburgh. Many of us at CBA have personal ties to Pittsburgh or the area.

Although our sympathetic prayers seem meager in the wake of the enormous weight of this tragedy, it joins into a bigger outpouring of love, warmth and solidarity from the other Jewish communities along with the greater United States Community. This wave reminds us that light and warmth will banish darkness; without exception. As opposed to letting this event close us off from our neighbors and make us suspicious of strangers – let us take the opportunity to get to know the people around our community better. We fear what we do not know.

One thing is certain. We will not let fear dictate how we worship or live our lives. Please note that we will continue as planned with our showing of “There Are Jews Here” at the Synagogue tomorrow. We hope to see you there!

With sorrow and a prayer for everlasting peace,
Jill Salsbury
President, Congregation Beth Aaron
************
October 28, 2018
Dear friends,

Shabbos in Bozeman ended a short time ago and I turned my phone on to see the horrific images out of the Tree of Life – Or L’Simcha Synagogue in Pittsburgh. The Torah says that upon hearing of the untimely passing of his sons Nadav and Avihu, Aaron, Moses’ brother and High Priest, was silent. There are times where speechlessness is the sound of a deep cry, a bitter heartbreak and an unfathomable tragedy being experienced.

Please join me tomorrow at Congregation Beth Shalom, Bozeman, at 3:30 PM for a community gathering in memory of our brothers and sisters in Pittsburgh and join us this upcoming Shabbos morning November 3rd for a Shabbat Prayer for Pittsburgh as our prayers and the sermon will be dedicated to Pittsburgh and our way forward as a Jewish community.

I know that so many of you are scared, broken and angry. The words of King David must always reverberate in our minds “The guardian of Israel neither slumbers nor sleeps” and may He protect our people wherever they are and may He bring comfort to the Synagogue and greater Pittsburgh community and the families who are mourning the loss of their loved ones.

Shavua Tov,

Rabbi Chaim Bruk
Director/Spiritual Leader
Chabad Lubavitch of Montana

THE SHABBos PROJECT 2018

Join us in 2018 with more than 1 million Jews around the world celebrating one single Shabbat …

Together we will keep the Shabbat of 26/27 October 2018 from sunset to stars out.

https://www.theshabbosproject.org/

YAHRZEITS — OCTOBER, 2018

RAM’S HORN POLICY FOR LISTING YAHRZEIT MEMORIALS:!
Yahrzeit memorials are listed by consecutive Gregorian month, date, and year, if known, or at the beginning of the list for one calendar year following the date of passing.

Compiled by Aitz Chaim over many years, this list is maintained by the Ram’s Horn. Please send any corrections or additions to editor@aitzchaim.com
May the source of peace send peace to all who mourn, and may we be a comfort to all who are bereaved.

Name of
Deceased
English Date of Passing Hebrew Date of Passing Deceased Relationship to
Congregant
Dawn Schandelson Sep 3, 2018 23 Elul, 5778 Wife of Arny Schandelson, Mother of Brett and Scott Schandelson
Donald Goldman May 14, 2018 29 Iyyar, 5778 Father of Abbee Drew, Grandfather of Cece Drew
Frances Waltman Apr 1, 2018 16 Nisan, 5778 Mother of Marjorie Feldman
Ann Cohn Oct 4, 1987 11 Tishrei, 5748 Mother of Arlyne Reichert
Irving Fineman Oct 12, 1981 14 Tishrei, 5742 Father of Robert Fineman
Vicki Sherick Hawkesworth Oct 12, 2013 9 Cheshvan, 5774 Daughter of Jack and Diane Sherick
Roberto Naduris Oct 14, 1995 20 Tishrei, 5756 Husband of Susan Weissman
Rose Gran Oct 14, 2014 20 Tishrei, 5775
Carl Kotler Oct 15, 1993 30 Tishrei, 5754
Hattye Oppenhemer Meyer Oct 16, 1968 24 Tishrei, 5729 Grandmother of Diane Sherick
Pauline Nagel Oct 16, 2000 17 Tishrei, 5761 Mother of Meriam Nagel
Robert Klotzman Oct 17, 1995 23 Tishrei, 5756
Alex Barrett Oct 18, 1990 29 Tishrei, 5751 Father of Nadyne Weissman
Marvin Langsam Oct 27, 2013 23 Cheshvan, 5774 Brother of Helen Cherry
Celia Ross Oct 30, 1972 22 Cheshvan, 5733 Great-grandmother of Cece Drew
Queenie Crombie Oct 30, 1992 3 Cheshvan, 5753 Mother of Arleen Heintzelman

DIASPORA ISRAEL DAY: CELEBRATING JEWISH PEOPLEHOOD 7 CHESHVAN

Diaspora Israel Day
Celebrating Jewish Peoplehood
7th of Cheshvan

The Hebrew calendar is filled, as we all know, with many holidays and festivals. Yet, there is one very meaningful Jewish value which is not manifested, or celebrated in any holiday – the value of Klal Israel.

We believe that these special bonds between Jewish communities across the globe, which have been persevered against all odds and despite all differences, is a true cause for celebration.

On this coming 7th of Cheshvan – October 27th 2017 – we invite you to celebrate with us Diaspora Israel Day.
Read More About Diaspora Israel Day

AN EVENING TO REMEMBER

image001Amber Ikeman, cantorial singer and songwriter, will be coming to Helena the weekend of November 10th and 11th. On the 10th, she will be performing some of her original work at Free Ceramic.

In addition, Amber is offering a free concert, previously performed and well-received in Bozeman, for the Helena Jewish community and friends on Saturday, November 11th at 7pm at Touchmark on Saddle Dr., in The Forum. This performance should last approximately one hour. Please tell your friends. Desserts for a social gathering following the performance are most welcome.

“OY, MAMA!”: Classic Yiddish folk songs, show tunes, original pieces, and heartfelt stories – all an homage to the Jewish Mother’s quirks and virtues. Presented by Cantorial Soloist/Singer Songwriter Amber Ikeman. Free (donations appreciated).

“Anchored by hilarious stories about her own mother, grandmothers, and generations beyond, Amber’s music deeply touched everyone in the crowd. Both the Yiddish and English songs captured the soul of Jewish motherhood and enriched our memories of our mothers and grandmothers, laughing at their eccentricities and crying for those we have lost. Amber’s voice and guitar are technically superb, but it’s the way she uses her talents to stir our deepest feelings that will leave you wanting more.” – Rabbi Ed Stafman

Submitted by Janet Tatz

AN OPEN INVITATION FROM CONGREGATION BETH AARON

The Shabbat Project was introduced in South Africa in 2013 to quite astonishing effect. On the Shabbat over which it ran, close to 70 percent of that country’s 75,000 Jews kept Shabbat to a more full degree, most for the first time in their lives.

Perhaps more significantly, the initiative drew people together in ways never seen before.

In the aftermath, many wrote in from around the world, wanting to bring the initiative to their own cities and communities. And so, The International Shabbat Project was born.

It has already been described as “an experiment that has no precedent in modern Jewish history,” and “the most ambitious Jewish unity initiative ever undertaken.”

In October 2016, over 1,000 cities in 90 countries held events, some with as many as 10,000 attendees. It is estimated that as many as 1,000,000 Jews participated in the numerous public and private celebrations of the Shabbat.

Congregation Beth Aaron has enrolled in this year’s The Shabbat Project. In addition to our Erev Shabbat Service and Oneg Shabbat Friday, October 27 and Shabbat Torah Study/Lunch-n-Learn Saturday, October 28, please join us for these other Shabbat morning and afternoon activities.

THE SHABBAT PROJECT-BILLINGS, MT
Friday, October 27, 2017, 8 Cheshvan, 5778:

  • 7:00 PM – SHIRIM UZ’MIROT/Songs and Hymns
  • 7:30 PM – KABBALAT SHABBAT/Welcoming the Sabbath
  • 8:45 PM – ONEG SHABBAT/Sabbath celebration

Saturday, October 28, 2017, 8 Cheshvan, 5778:

  • 9:00 AM – SHACHARIT L’SHABBAT/Sabbath Morning Service (No Torah service or D’VAR TORAH.)
  • 10:00 AM – Torah Study
  • 12:00 PM – Lunch-n-Learn (Non-hosted lunch; bring your own dairy or vegetarian selection.)
  • 5:00 PM – SEUDAH SHELISHIT/Third Sabbath meal (Hosted cheese pizza and salad.)
  • 6:00 PM – HAVDALAH/Separation of the Sabbath
  • Submitted by brian Schnitzer