Author Archives: Joy Breslauer

PLEASE MAKE YOUR PASSSOVER RESERVATIONS NOW

photo caption

Traditional arrangement of symbolic foods on a Passover Seder Plate (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Our community Passover seder is coming up in about three weeks! The seder will be held on Friday, April 10, 2015, at 5:30 P.M. at the meeting room at Clark and Lewie’s restaurant, 7th Street and 1st Avenue South.

Please RSVP as soon as possible! You can make your reservation on our website by visiting http://aitzchaim.com/pesach-seder-reservations/, by sending Laura Weiss an email at president@aitzchaim.com or by calling her at 452-8621.

YAHRZEITS — MARCH, 2015

RAM’S HORN POLICY FOR LISTING YAHRZEIT MEMORIALS:!
Yahrzeit memorials are listed by consecutive Gregorian month, date, and year, if known, or at the beginning of the list for one calendar year following the date of passing.

Compiled by Aitz Chaim over many years, this Yahrzeit list is maintained by the Ram’s Horn. Please send any corrections or additions to editor@aitzchaim.com

May the source of peace send peace to all who mourn, and comfort to all who are bereaved.

Name of
Deceased
English Date of Passing Hebrew Date of Passing Deceased Relationship to
Congregant
Dr. Charles (Chuck) Astrin Jan 29, 2015 17 Sh’vat, 5775
Rose Gran Oct 14, 2014 20 Tishrei, 5775
Edith Semple Mar 2, 2010 17 Adar, 5770 Mother of Doug Semple
Sophia Weissman Mar 12, 1967 30 Adar I, 5727 Grandmother of Jerry Weissman
Benjamin Barrett Mar 13, 1968 13 Adar I, 5728 Grandfather of Nadyne Weissman
Sylvia Fineman Mar 13, 2009 18 Adar, 5769 Aunt of Jerry Weissman
Pauline Eichner Mar 14, 1991 28 Adar I, 5751 Mother of Jerry Eichner
Marcia Eisenberg Mar 15, 1992 10 Adar II, 5752 Mother of Sharon Eisenberg
Allan B. Silverstein Mar 16, 2012 22 Adar, 5772 Father of Errol Silverstein
Fanny Drellich Mar 17, 1930 17 Adar I, 5690 Grandmother of Arlyne Reichert
Morris Schandelson Mar 28, 1988 10 Nissan, 5748 Father of Arnold Schandelson
Lillian Gissen Mar 30 Mother of Marion Kelman
Harry Crombie Mar 31, 1967 19 Adar II, 5727 Father of Arleen Heintzelman

FREE ONLINE HEBREW BIBLE-TANAKH COURSE

25-Session Video Lecture Series

“Shaye J. D. Cohen is the Littauer Professor of Hebrew Literature and Philosophy in the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations of Harvard University. He received his Ph.D. in Ancient History, with distinction, from Columbia University in 1975. He is also an ordained rabbi, and for many years was the Dean of the Graduate School and Shenkman Professor of Jewish History at the Conservative Movement’s Jewish Theological Seminary in New York. Before arriving at Harvard in July 2001, he was for ten years the Samuel Ungerleider Professor of Judaic Studies and Professor of Religious Studies at Brown University. The focus of Cohen’s research is the boundary between Jews and gentiles and between Judaism and its surrounding culture. He is also a published authority on Jewish reactions to Hellenism and to Christianity.

Cohen has received several honors for his work, including an honorary doctorate from the Jewish Theological Seminary and various fellowships. He has been honored by appointment as Croghan Distinguished Visiting Professor of Religion (Williams College), the Louis Jacobs Lecturer (Oxford University), the David M. Lewis Lecturer (Oxford University), Lady Davis Fellowship (Visiting Professor) of Jewish History (Hebrew University of Jerusalem), the Block Lecturer (Indiana University), the Roland Visiting Lecturer (Stanford University) and the Pritchett Lecturer (University of California, Berkeley). He appeared on a Nova episode as an expert on Jewish history. He also appears in PBS’s Jesus to Christ Documentary.”

http://www.biblicalarchaeology.org/daily/biblical-topics/hebrew-bible/free-hebrew-bible-course-with-shaye-cohen/?mqsc=E3790054&utm_source=WhatCountsEmail&utm_medium=BHD+Week%20in%20Review%20Newsletter&utm_campaign=E5W228

http://courses.biblicalarchaeology.org/hebrewbible/#

Submitted by Brian Schnitzer

HAMANTASCHEN; NEW TWISTS ON A HOLIDAY CLASSIC

https://ou.org/life/inspiration/hamantaschen/

SAVE THE DATE

Please mark your calendars for these upcoming events.

  • Wednesday, 04/04-05/2015: Purim
  • Friday, 04/10/2015, 5:30 P.M.: Aitz Chaim Community Seder at the O’Haire. More details TBA.
  • Friday, 05/15-17/2015: Jewish week end with Ruz Gulko. More details TBA.

CAN YOU PASS DOWN CULTURAL JUDAISM WITHOUT THE FAITH?

I find this concept to be an important issue in American society. I hope you read it and enjoy it.
Submitted by Elliott Magalnick

http://forward.com/articles/215198

A JEWISH PERSPECTIVE ON WHY WE ARE PRECIOUS

WHY WE ARE PRECIOUS
By Ruz Gulko

“There are three partners to each human’s creation: mother, father, and God.” (Talmud)

The Hebrew word A D A M, human, has no plural. Why is that?
Each of us is unique, singular, never to be replicated, ONE:
Each of us is CREATED IN GOD’S IMAGE “B’tzelem Eloheem”

Our bodies are a GIFT, as are our minds and souls. To do anything to hurt or abuse any of these parts of us is not just a tragedy for us, but a sin against God and our families. Our parents, families and communities have put so much effort, faith and love into our general care, feeding, and education. We do not OWN these bodies all by ourselves – we have a responsibility to God and to our community to take good care of them.

So many of the laws that we are given in the Torah are about making sure that we lead as healthy and happy lives as possible, in a righteous, kind society.

A Jew is discouraged from living in a place without a synagogue or Jewish community, but forbidden to live where there is no doctor.

Any Shabbat law can be broken to save a life. Pikuah nefesh, saving of life, is THE foremost Jewish responsibility.

We are commanded to take good care of ourselves.

Today, how can YOU take good care of yourself?

WHAT TO DO OR NOT DO AT A SHIVA home

From Rabbi Kalman Pacouz Aish HaTorah

GOOD MORNING! Death is a very sad part of life. In our tradition, we sit Shiva (“shiva” is the Hebrew word for “seven” referring to the seven days we mourn) for our seven closest relatives: father, mother, brother, sister, spouse, son or daughter.

Visiting a Shiva house can be a comfort to the mourners and a meaningful experience to the comforters — if done right. However, visiting a Shiva home can cause a person to be ill at ease if he doesn’t understand his role in the mourning process and doesn’t know the halacha (Jewish law) governing behavior at a Shiva home.

Mourning is a time to spiritually and psychologically come to terms with one’s loss. For seven days the mourner sits on a low chair or cushion, doesn’t leave the house, withdraws from the world around him. Why? Now is the time to cry, to remember the good times, to feel the loss. If a person doesn’t allow himself — or isn’t allowed — to focus on this, the pain remains longer and stronger and hampers the continuation of his own life.

Jewish law prescribes that when one enters the house of a mourner, he should sit silently until spoken to by the mourner — so that he will not intrude upon the mourner. Just being there is comforting. Sometimes there is no need for words. If the mourner engages you in conversation, it is important that the conversation should focus upon the deceased. It is a great kindness to ask questions which concretize memories and feelings: What was his outstanding character trait? What was one incident which encapsulates his life? What was his greatest impact upon you? This focuses the mourner and helps him to both grieve and integrate the impact the deceased had on his life.

People are uncomfortable at the home of a mourner because they are unclear of what function they should serve. That is why people mistakenly try to change the subject and avoid talking about the deceased. What is intended as a kindness ends up as a disservice. Remember that a Shiva house is not a party.

Recently, I visited a Shiva house and picked up a guide sheet of two pages by L. Muschel of “Do’s and Don’ts.” I think they are helpful, though to some they may seem obvious. Here are excerpts and some of my own (which incorporate some of the points mentioned above):

DO’s at a Shiva Home

1. Do sit quietly until spoken to by the mourner. Your presence is often enough. It is up to the mourner if he or she wishes to talk.
2. Do focus the conversation on the deceased and ask questions about a) the greatest time they had together b) the most important lesson learned from the deceased c) what character traits the mourner admired most about the deceased d) the nicest thing the deceased ever did e) the most meaningful thing the deceased ever did.
3. Share meaningful stories of what the deceased did for you and share what the deceased meant to you.
4. Do respect the time — stay a short time and not too late.

DON’T’s at a Shiva Home

1. Don’t ask how old the deceased was. It really doesn’t matter. If he or she was elderly you imply that it was not painful to the mourners.
2. Do not ask if he knew that he was ill and dying. It’s irrelevant and hurtful.
3. Do not use the Shiva visit as a self-therapy session to discuss your own loss of a relative.
4. Do not socialize with other people in front of the mourners or direct the conversation away from the deceased.
5. Do not say, “He had a long life.” It is never long enough.
6. Do not say, “Is there anything I can do?” If you can do it, just do it. Stay in touch after the mourning period.

If you want to learn more on how to deal with death and help your fellow human being who is grieving, read The Jewish Way in Death and Mourning by Rabbi Maurice Lamm. If you want a book to give the mourner to help him or her, I highly recommend (and give it myself), Remember My Soul by Rabbi Yaakov and Lori Palatnik. Both are available from your local Jewish book store or by calling toll-free 877-758-3242.

Submitted by Jerry Weissman

YAHRZEITS — FEBRUARY, 2015

RAM’S HORN POLICY FOR LISTING YAHRZEIT MEMORIALS:!
Yahrzeit memorials are listed by consecutive Gregorian month, date, and year, if known, or at the beginning of the list for one calendar year following the date of passing.

Compiled by Aitz Chaim over many years, this Yahrzeit list is maintained by the Ram’s Horn. Please send any corrections or additions to editor@aitzchaim.com

May the source of peace send peace to all who mourn, and comfort to all who are bereaved.

Name of
Deceased
English Date of Passing Hebrew Date of Passing Deceased Relationship to
Congregant
Dr. Charles (Chuck) Astrin Jan 29, 2015 17 Sh’vat, 5775
Rose Gran Oct 14, 2014 20 Tishrei, 5775
Kikki Schandelson Feb 1, 1979 4 Sh’vat, 5739 Stepmother of Arnold Schandelson
Diane Magalnick Feb 2, 2002 20 Sh’vat, 5762 wife of Elliot Magalnick
Joel Eisenberg Feb 3, 1982 10 Sh’vat, 5742 brother of Sharon Eisenberg
Jack Barrett Feb 6, 2006 8 Sh’vat, 5766 Uncle of Nadyne Weissman
Judith Lenore Astrin Feb 15, 2014 15 Adar I, 5774
Harold “Rick”
Reichert
Feb 22, 1968 23 Sh’vat, 5728 Husband of Arlyne Reichert
Elizabeth Orphal Feb 27, 2009 3 Adar, 5769 Grandmother of Karen Semple

Amazon.com: The New Diaspora: The Changing Landscape of American Jewish Fiction (9780814340554): Avinoam J. Patt, Mark Shechner, Victoria

From Marjorie Feldman: the book has been released…With My painting on the cover.

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